THE GOOD EGG – A Cycle-Skate Trip in Aid of Suicide Prevention

Ok. Here we are. It took me more than 6 months to slowly piece this little video together. Every few weeks I would find a 20 minute window here, or a couple of hours there. Then I would second guess the whole thing. “Who wants to know about depression and suicide anyway? Such a bummer.” Then… “No. It’s a story worth telling. It’s a subject worth talking about.” Then, “who wants to know?” then, “it’s a story worth telling,” and so on and so forth.

On Feb 1 just gone, my sister would have turned 38. And she would be a grandmother. An amazing grandmother…

a photograph of Katrina Rattray

The article below does a decent job, I think, of describing the story of what we’re doing and why here. It originally appeared in Thrasher Magazine.

THE GOOD EGG

In 2011, my sister, Katrina, died of depression. She was a beautiful, talented figure skater who spiraled gracefully across the ice, pirouetting in a light amber dress. She was a hard-working project manager for an oil company. And she was a loving—and fun-loving—mother.
Ever since her suicide, I’ve wanted to raise money to help others with mental health issues—hopefully to help prevent more untimely deaths. I had no clue how to go about doing this.
Because of Katrina’s death, my cousin, Liam, was driven to quit his uninspiring bank job—and start fresh working with the Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH).
SAMH does a bunch of community work, suicide prevention training and mental health outreach around Scotland. In 2016, they carried out 177 suicide interventions and their work has been integral in reducing the suicide rate in Scotland by 17% over the last ten years. It made sense to me to support SAMH, but now what? How?
It turns out that there is an app, Just Giving, where you can just be sitting on the toilet and set up your campaign in 5 minutes flat. Done. Then you wipe your arse, wash your hands, post about it on social media and the game begins. But how was I going to inspire people to give? Maybe just by doing what I liked to do anyway—by riding bikes and skating.
To make it interesting, I claimed I would ride my bike from Portland to Lincoln City and relearn Egg Plants—provided we hit my arbitrary $1000 target. We hit that target twenty-four hours later and I realized it was, as they say, on like Donkey Kong.
Before long I had a small crew of friends who were keen to join me on the bike ride. The more the merrier, I say.
The best crew member—and nobody in the ride would deny this—was an old friend who replied to my IG post and Egg Plant claim. “The flying Scotsman rides again!” John Cardiel wrote. “Stay strong and weather the storm my friend. #endurance.” I hit him back with a quick DM, “Yo, John. You want to ride with?” A little while later he got back, “Just tell me where and when we leave from. I will be there.”
Now if there’s anyone on this earth who I consider my actual legitimate hero, it’s Cardiel. On July 1st, at 7.30am, he blazed around the corner at the bottom of my street and rolled up to the assembled crew, ready to rock, just like he said he would. Then he fucking smashed 100 miles with one good leg pulling his bad leg around, drafting the squad and laughing all the way up every mountain pass and down every hill bomb. Down roads framed by deep green pine trees, past the Nestucca river, and on down the 101 to Lincoln City. Full-scale superhuman status. “Rattray, Rattray, stay on my back wheel, I’ll draft you.” He’d yell. “Here! Eat this amino acid, take this potassium, drink this whiskey, it’s Irish,” he’d advise. “As long as I’m in the saddle peddling I’m as stoked as a kid in a candy store,” he’d explain.

John Cardiel mashing through the forest
Photo: Brent Wick

I suppose the point of this rant is that if John is not your hero, to some degree, then you are either lacking intelligence or, worryingly, you may be depressed. In which case you should, no joke, seek out a good psychiatrist or have a friend do so on your behalf. Maybe get medicated so you can stabilize yourself to the point that you can smarten up and reestablish Cards as your hero and spiritual guide through this dark and scary world that we inhabit.
On the road, we rolled past vineyards and fields of cows and horses and turkeys and we spoke about music, and John’s brother, who died from Heroin addiction. We talked about the idea that there’s something self-destructive that switches on in some people. Unchecked, the resulting mental chain-reaction can be fatal. We talked about the idea that full-on alcoholism is a slow form of suicide. Then we reached a peak, and tucked and bombed and John hit 50mph smiling like that kid in the candy store. I did the same, but I only hit 42.
Then we made it to Lincoln City and I beat the crap out of myself for about 50 tries before putting down a reasonably respectable Egg Plant.

John Rattray Egg Plant Lincoln CIty Skatepark during the Good Egg Cycle Trip in Aid of Suicide Prevention
Photo: Joe Brook

We’ve made about $4300 for SAMH so far. Their work never ends, so thanks to everyone who supported up to now. Let’s keep it going. Oh, and it’s on again next year with everyone raising funds for the charity or organization of their choice. I’ll not be trying an Egg again next year. It’ll be a bit different. And I’ll not be doing another 100-mile day. That shit was brutal.

 

THE GOOD EGG: A BICYCLE-SKATE MISSION IN AID OF THE SCOTTISH ASSOCIATION FOR MENTAL HEALTH.

benson, jonah, quinn, cardiel, rattray, marty, oleg, brent, and molly all with bikes on the road

Ok, so we did it. Myself, Brent, Molly, Marty, Quinn, Benson, Jonah, Oleg, and Cards rode 100 miles to Lincoln City, then we met up with Philippa and Ivor, camped out at the Art Barn in Beaver Creek and the next day went to Lincoln City skatepark and I beat the crap out of myself until I landed an Egg Plant. It wasn’t the greatest Egg ever landed but it was a good Egg, so I’ll take it. Maybe in a week or two, once my body stops feeling like it’s been beaten with sticks by an angry mob of leprechauns, I will try another one just on principal. Either way, Joe showed up in time and shot a pretty nice photo of it and Jon and Kurt shot everything on video so we can put together the little documentary over the next little while. Stay tuned and thanks for the support. You can help fund the ongoing cause of Scottish Mental Health awareness and Suicide outreach, education and prevention, here. Thanks, love to all…check the pics below and then get out there and do good stuff.

The crew mashing
Cardiel, Marty and Quinn mashing along the Nestucca River Road.
Cardiel Mashing
All hail.

Cards Rattray Sk8 Mafia gang sign

egg plant attempt.
Poopy style. Not inverted. Just getting more and more beat up.

The patches ready to ship
Ready for the post office.

THE FIXER SKATEBOARDS PROMO

If you live in the Northwest and need a reason for living, or if you live outside the Northwest and need a reason to visit and continue living, then the Fixer promo delivers.
Fixer skateboards is owned and operated by ultimate Phil Stern. Phil is a skilled hardware connoisseur who can tell you the gauge and thread count of a machine screw just by looking at it. He is also a master gardener. The Fixer squad is him, Tim, Ryan and Miles; those guys are freaks in the best possible sense of the term. Interviews coming soon. First I need to ride out to the coast to do an eggplant. In the meantime, please enjoy…THE FIXER PROMO.

 

THE GOOD EGG: A BICYCLE MISSION TO COLLECT AN EGG IN AID OF SUICIDE PREVENTION

the good egg embroidered patchI’m raising money for the Scottish Association of Mental Health because in 2011 my sister, Katrina, took her own life.

Up to that point she had spent her adult life climbing up to manic summits and descending down into dark valleys. But none of us knew how dark and confused those valleys had become.

Of course, when my Stepfather text messaged me with a frantic three exclamation points, “John. Call home NOW!!!”, I knew that something crazy had to have gone down, but nothing can prepare you for the total disembowelment that news like that arrives with.

Katrina had been outwardly happy, fun-loving, hard-working and loved by her friends. But somehow she’d been swept to a point where she just couldn’t see that at all anymore. As a little girl she was a talented figure skater and had even got back into that and horse riding in the months prior to her last day. That had all faded away, and looking back it had faded away with an alarming velocity.

In the turbulent months that followed Katrina’s death, my cousin, Liam, changed his life path and got a job working with the Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH). They’re a non-profit in Scotland who provide suicide outreach, education, and mental-health support to all who need it. They Can always use more cash and rely on a variety of funding sources, like this Just Giving campaign I set up. Of course, fundraising begins with the word, “fun”, so to encourage some donations I’ve decided to ride my bicycle to the Oregon Coast and relearn Egg Plants. I haven’t done an Egg Plant in at least 8 years, so we’ll see how that goes. Please support the cause and wish me luck. I will need it.

a photograph of Katrina Rattray

Skater Men | Going pro with Ultimate Phil

Phil with an axe looking seriousMeet Phil. Phil is a real man who skates. Besides being a father, husband, music-maker and entrepreneur, Phil also works hard at the local hardware store. There he trades in traditionally manly things, such as tools, nuts and bolts. Hard things. When we started working on this short piece Phil was 37, and he was coming to terms with the stark realization that it was probably his last chance in life to finally kickstart his dream career as a world-renowned professional skateboarder. Now Phil’s 40, and he runs a small, independent, board brand — Fixer Skateboards.
The thing is, if at the age of 37 Phil had followed the herd and pursued the standard pro path, riding for a bigger brand, like Girl, it would have been too obvious, and even worse than that it would have certainly oppressed his creativity. We do well to remember that the biological clock stops ticking for no living being and not a millisecond can be wasted executing someone else’s vision. So Phil didn’t pursue a big brand endorsement, he got a job at the hardware store, and now thanks to its modest size, running his Fixer brand on the side really allows Phil the artistic space he needs to continue to grow and contribute to the culture as a genuine devoted dreamer of dreams, and a formidable professional skater man.

Stalefish 101 with Fernando

Fernando Bramsmark peaks out with a big stalefish on the sea walls at the Barcelona Forum
Big fish.
I love working with the best humans who ever rolled on the surface of the earth. For me Columbian-born Swede, Fernando Bramsmark, easily falls into that category.
Not too long ago we put together this little video piece all about the grab we know today as the stalefish. We were in Barcelona and while we were there we sent a message to Lance Mountain asking him why this perfectly good-looking grab got named after something so unpleasant. Here’s what he sent back: “Summer camp, Sweden, 1985, Tony [Hawk] did them. Lunch was served in aluminum containers. Once a week we would have this bad fish. Tony and I were calling it stalefish with [many] bones and we’d go eat at McDonald’s. A British guy asked Tony if the trick he did was a Stalefish with [Many] Bones. It stuck. Tony did backside ones too. Gonz, I think, got the first photo two years later that popularized it. And he did the classic fold-down knee.” So there you have it, despite how utterly insane, doomed and incomprehensible the world might currently appear to be, we can take comfort in the fact that both Fernando and the stalefish have Swedish roots in common.

nando-youness-forum-2016-rattray-blackandwhite

Young gull on the beach
Stale fish preferred

Post Script:

I updated a text glitch above, from ‘no’ to ‘many’. If you need more stalefish intel then take a breath and enter Mackenzie Eisenhour’s stalefish wormhole.